MHA E-Newsletter

Receive periodic updates from MHA including mental health news, upcoming events, legislative news and research updates. You may unsubscribe at any time.




Date: 7/10/2018 11:17:58 AM

July is Minority Mental Health Month

my-story-my-way.png

Why are the topics of mental health and mental illness not regularly talked about in diverse groups of people, such as people of color, LGBT+ individuals, and refugee and immigrant communities?

Could it be that mental illness doesn’t occur in these communities and among its varied people?

Of course not. Mental illness can occur in all people and across all communities.

Through our 2017 Minority Mental Health Month campaign, #NotACharacterFlaw, we asked the question: How does your community talk about mental health or mental illness? The answer most people came to, was clear – we don’t talk about these issues.

However, we believe and know that people do talk about these issues, but they express themselves differently. The phrases and expressions that people use to talk about these issues oftentimes never touch on terms like “mental health” or “mental illness.” The fact is - the way in which individuals talk or don’t talk about mental health and mental illness is influenced directly by the society and culture that a person is a part of. The way we talk about these issues is a learned behavior.

That’s why, this year, we are focusing on highlighting and validating the voices and experiences of individuals from across a range of communities through our #MyStoryMyWay campaign. We want to listen and learn from you as you help to shed light on the way diverse communities (i.e. people of color, LGBT+, refugee and immigrant communities) perceive, narrate, communicate, and address mental health and mental illness.


greg-story-1.jpg#MyStoryMyWay

Greg Washington is a board member for Mental Health America of Wisconsin and pastor at Immanuel Church in Milwaukee. He was recently a guest on MENtal Health Monday, a weekly podcast by Riggs of 103.7 KISSfm.

Greg talks about dealing with his anxiety personally, the church's view on mental health, and why the mental health stigma is so strong amongst African American men.

Listen to the podcast >>

Hear more from Greg and others sharing their stories >>

Learn more about Minority Mental Health Awareness Month >>